Bender

Nice Q.C., G.M.

The power window switch in the front passenger door of our newly-acquired 2005 Malibu Classic didn't work. Upon investigation, the switch was assembled with one of the pins bent and not inserted into the hole (see first picture). 2 minute job to pop off the cover, straighten the pin, and put the cover back on.

But clearly, not only did this switch leave the manufacturer obviously broken and just as obviously never tested, but GM also clearly never tested to see if the switch worked, because it never could have worked.

I was actually cracking into the electrical system to fix an intermittent problem with the turn signals, which turned out to be a loose fuse holder. There's no way to know in that case but I wouldn't be surprised to find out that it left the factory loose as well. It was not really holding onto the fuse on one side, just sort of sitting there, usually making contact. I couldn't figure out how to get the fuse box out to do a proper job, and neither Chilton's nor Google helped, so I just reached in with a pen knife and bent the holder to hopefully make better contact. If it flakes again I'll just have to get the fusebox out one way or another.
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The power window switch in the front passenger door of our newly-acquired 2005 Malibu Classic didn't work. Upon investigation, the switch was assembled with one of the pins bent and not inserted into the hole (see first picture). 2 minute job to pop off the cover, straighten the pin, and put the cover back on.

But clearly, not only did this switch leave the manufacturer obviously broken and just as obviously never tested, but GM also clearly never tested to see if the switch worked, because it never could have worked.

I was actually cracking into the electrical system to fix an intermittent problem with the turn signals, which turned out to be a loose fuse holder. There's no way to know in that case but I wouldn't be surprised to find out that it left the factory loose as well. It was not really holding onto the fuse on one side, just sort of sitting there, usually making contact. I couldn't figure out how to get the fuse box out to do a proper job, and neither Chilton's nor Google helped, so I just reached in with a pen knife and bent the holder to hopefully make better contact. If it flakes again I'll just have to get the fusebox out one way or another.
<a href="http://www.hauntedfrog.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7538><img src="http://www.hauntedfrog.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=7539&g2_serialNumber=1"><img src="http://www.hauntedfrog.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=7541&g2_serialNumber=1">
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<ul><li>Bob Wittig - I find it hard to believe that someone would buy a car and not discover that one of the window switches was broken and not raise holy ned with the dealer. It seems more likely someone messed it up after the fact.

HOWEVER, I have not problem believing it could have left the factory that way, but the QC, the dealer or the buyer would have noticed... Maybe I just am an optimist.
<li>John Ridley - It was a fleet car, probably never driven with passengers very much if at all. After 6 years it only had 30K on it. There was something bolted to the center console on the passenger side so it's possible that there never was a passenger in it.

And as a fleet car, I find it entirely possible that they just rolled a bunch of them off the truck and did very minimal prep since they probably got paid very little if anything for the dealer prep.

Thing is, in order for someone to have screwed it up, they'd have had to remove the switch, then take the switch apart, then reassemble it wrong. The pin wasn't just bent, it was not in the hole.
<li>John Ridley - In the end I still don't mind this so much, because it was fixable. The switch was easy to pop out of the door, and easy to take apart without destroying it, easy to fix the problem and put everything back together. Too many other manufacturers heat-bond or glue everything shut or attach things via plastic bits that are designed to break and have to be replaced when you take them off to work on them.</ul>