Bender

Couldn't take it anymore

My laptop came with a 750G drive, all one drive except for a boot partition (which probably contains an image recovery system, I guess), and a couple of small (15 and 30GB) partitions up high. That's 4 partitions so I couldn't make any more.

So I decided to try to do things the Windows 7 way and store all my data below "My Documents"

Over the weekend I got to where I just couldn't take it anymore. I want to know exactly where my data is at all times. I want a user area that I can write to, always. I don't want to have invisible soft links associated with my data. Most of all, I want to have a physically separate partition for user data, so that I can back up my C: drive once a week or so (full drive image) and if I ever get to where I have a non-viable Windows install for any reason (virus or just decay) (I've never had a virus but with XP decay set in about every 1.5 to 2.5 years) I can just re-image the C: drive on demand since there's never any data there to worry about. And I definitely do NOT want hundreds of directories with thousands of files with everything from CAD work files to video editing projects all below "My Documents."

Upon further examination, it turns out that the 30GB upper partition was an NTFS drive in an extended partition, just there to hold the installations for the software that the computer shipped with, and the drivers for all the devices (this is actually quite nice) so it was easy enough to resize the drives. Now I need to move my user data to D:
Tags:
Did you know that you can just tell Windows to store My Documents on the D drive? I forget the exact incantation, but that's what I've done on the work computer.
Yes, and I will do that, but I had to make the D: drive big enough to be useful first.
When I first got it I saw a couple of small partitions up high and thought that they were both for drive imaging (factory restore, etc) and I would have to forfeit the imaging capability to be able to create a D: partition (since there's a limit of 4 primary partitions per hard drive).

On Sunday I decided I didn't care, I was willing to make that trade, but upon examination it turned out that one of those partitions was a usable but too small D: already, so I just resized.

The reason I thought this is that some previous machine from a less smart company than Lenovo (I think eMachines or something) had a D: drive that was readable as a normal partition but you couldn't actually use it or you'd screw up their imaging software.

Edited at 2011-10-31 03:09 pm (UTC)